Cole’s interview . . . for my dear mother.

 

jes-2.jpgTo read Cole’s original interview, go here.

Cole, my mother joked that she would need a dictionary to read your interview. Since she’s been one of my biggest supporters all of my life, I felt she deserved a simplified interview. Do you remember her? Will you help me out? What is your place in Meros society?

  • Of course, I remember her. Ages ago. I’d be glad to help her out. I’m an honored senior officer, which means that, if my sister and older brother die, I’ll become one of the nation’s rulers.
    I’m an attorney and teacher of Meros laws, as well as an expert in Unified customs. I speak in universities and teach law to officers who want to be law enforcers. I believe you call those police where you’re at? It’s a military rank, though. There are soldiers with no other rank attached to them, which can become officers. Officers can become senior officers.
    Of course, I’m an honored Senior Officer because of our Kyrios connection.

What are the essential differences between the Meros and the Unified? What keeps them divided?

  • Our history goes back hundreds of years. The story is that the Unified rejected the god of their ancestors and Its Book of Light. Their lawmakers made choices that didn’t honor God when that happened. So, a group of lawmakers banded together to represent the religious people who didn’t appreciate the laws that didn’t honor God.
    That group of lawmakers became known as the Kyrios and they gained an appreciative following of religious people who became known as the Merited Ones. They shortened it and changed it a bit to be “The Meros.”
    So, we didn’t agree on politics or religion. After The Conquest, we became even more different. The Unified and the Meros are nothing alike. Completely different cultures.
    The Meros culture allows drunkenness, casual sex, and any number of behaviors that the Unified would frown on. Whereas, the Unified rely on strict rules and morality for their survival.

After The Conquest, did the Meros maintain a similar form of government? What did The Conquest do? What does it mean?

  • The Conquest was a civil war between the Kyrios and their followers, and the president and those who were loyal to him. The Kyrios and their followers won.
    The system immediately turned into a theocratic oligarchy (a government run by several rulers who claim to speak for God) with new laws based on the Book of Light.

Polygamy is popular in Meros society. Do you practice polygamy? What do you think of it?

  • Polygyny, which is the marriage of one man to more than one woman, is popular and encouraged, but polyandry, the marriage of one woman to more than one man, is forbidden. A man can have as many Unified wives as he wishes, but he may have only one Meros wife. Only Meros women are allowed to have children with Meros men, however. I don’t like it. Unified women are sometimes treated well, but many times, they’re purchased to be little more than slaves or sex objects, which I don’t agree with. Marriage to more than one woman may offer a few benefits, depending on the circumstance, but since the women aren’t permitted to have children, it creates a terrible situation for all involved. It makes women a thing meant for pleasure alone and encourages Unified slavery. So, no I don’t practice polygamy. I’m unmarried and I don’t like Meros women. They have ridiculous fashion and dress like men. I’ve been involved with Meros women, but I’ve never been interested in a committed relationship, much less marriage, with a Meros woman any more than I’ve been interested in buying a Unified woman at an auction and calling her a wife.

A lighter question? What’s your favorite color?

  • I don’t have one. But I can say that I enjoy the color of fertile soil and the green of leaves and grass on a gray rainy day. Whatever color that haze is around a woman’s face after a pleasant kiss . . . I admit I like that one, too, whether she’s Meros, or not. Silver? Pearl? There’s a color to it, I just can’t put my finger on it.
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